• How do I perfectly cook a medium rare steak?

    Best answer: Perfect steak is largely about practice. I also like medium rare. I typically am cooking the New Zealand grass fed steaks I get in the freezer section of Trader Joe’s, they are about 3/4 - 1 inch thick. I TIME the cooking. Individual times will vary depending on your heat source and your pan. I will always use... show more
    Best answer: Perfect steak is largely about practice. I also like medium rare. I typically am cooking the New Zealand grass fed steaks I get in the freezer section of Trader Joe’s, they are about 3/4 - 1 inch thick.

    I TIME the cooking. Individual times will vary depending on your heat source and your pan. I will always use a very very heavy pan like cast iron, enamel cast iron or a very heavy bottom stainless pan. I use a skillet shaped shallow type pan. I used to use the broiler but ever since I worked for years with a cooking school I now do on the stovetop. I also used to grill but due to carbon buildups, dealing with coals, etc, I haven’t fired up my Q in years. in fact, I think I’ll sell it at my upcoming yard sale.

    Your steak needs to be at room temperature or the inside will take too long to cook. I also massage the steaks a bit, this seems to “relax” the meat fibers a bit. I know it sounds weird but I saw Julia Childs mention it once and when I tried it it seemed to make a difference in texture.

    I lay the room temperature, massaged steak on a plate, pat it dry on all sides with a paper towel, salt and pepper it and rub it all over with a little olive oil.

    I put my heavy bottom skillet (or grill pan if I want fancy hatch marks) over a medium heat and let the pan really heat up. On both my old propane stove and my current electric stove dead medium on the burner dial seems to give me the same amount of heat.

    Once the pan is hot I gently set the steak into it with tongs. It should immediately be sizzling merrily but not smoking or popping. If I’m using a grill pan and want hatch marks I let it cook for 3.5 minutes then give it a quarter turn for another 3.5 minutes. If I’m not going for hatch marks I leave it for a full 7 minutes. After 7 minutes I use tongs to turn the steak over and do the same on the other side. USE A TIMER. My current timer doesn’t do half minutes so I do three minutes then I count out the half minute.

    Once the steak has cooked on both sides I remove it from the pan and place it on a plate that I have allowed to warm on the stovetop, cover it with another inverted plate and set the timer for 10 minutes for the steak to rest. Resting is VERY important, the residual heat will continue to cook the steak and the juices will redistribute inside the steak. If you cut into it right away the juices will flow out all over the plate. Keeping those juices inside the steak is also why you handle it with tongs, not stab it with a fork to turn it. While I occasionally use a meat thermometer for some things, I find it entirely unnecessary for steaks. This is partly about experience so I don’t need to and partly that I don’t want to pierce the steaks and lose the juices.

    I use the steak resting time to either made a pan sauce with the fond in the pan (don’t usually do a sauce for the grass fed steak - if I want a pan sauce - like green peppercorn sauce - I use a regular sirloin instead) or to finish the other things I’m serving with the steak and get them plated in preparation for the steak being done.

    If I want the steak to be restaurant glossy, I will melt a pat of butter over it while it rests. If I want to really show off or be fancy I will melt a pat of butter in a small metal container, add a drop or two of garlic juice (I have several different meshes of garlic presses, one produces juice only) and brush this butter over the steak with a brush made of lightly squeezed rosemary tips bundled together right before serving. I saw that on a video once of how to make a perfect steak and it is a subtle but noticeable difference.

    I know my cooking temp and time sounds different from what you will read about in most recipes - I’m almost 60 and this is how I’ve been cooking my steaks for ... the last 20 years.

    It takes practice, so pay attention, use your timer. Different stovetops, different pans might have somewhat different results so you may need to adjust your timing. You can also pay attention to what is going on with the fluids on the top of the meat. You will get an eye for what should be happening when. Because of the variable heat on a grill that is part of what I would watch when I was grilling.

    Because I am usually also preparing sides to go with the steak, the timer is essential for me so I don’t lose track of what is happening with the steak. I will usually prep everything first and get all my sides going before putting the steaks on so I can finish everything while the steaks cook and then rest so it’s all ready at the same time.

    My favorite meal ever, a perfect steak, mashed potatoes (with roasted garlic, yum!), sautéed mushrooms with tarragon (and maybe red wine) and vegetables, especially aspargus or spinach. When I do this meal I tend to keep the veges pretty simply cooked and seasoned so they are a nice fresh foil for the rest of the meal.

    For the most amazingly perfect mashed potatoes ever, start with half russet and half yellow potatoes peeled and cut into similarly sized chunks in very salty (like the ocean) cold water in a pot. Put the pot of salty water and potatoes over high heat, bring to a simmer and simmer til tender. Don’t cook past fully tender or the pototoes will get mushy and gross. Immediately drain the potatoes in a colander, put the pot back on the stove with butter, say 4 tablespoons if you started with four large potatos, let the butter melt (not burn or brown) then add the potatoes back to the pot with the butter and adjust the texture with BUTTERMILK. The buttermilk gives a wonderful tang and creamy texture. Mash well or even better, run through a potato ricer if you have one for the fluffiest potatoes.

    Using half the russet/starchy potatoes and half the yellow/waxy potatoes is also key here relating to texture. All starchy will require too much buttermilk and butter and all waxy can get “gluey”. Because the water is salted (most of which gets discarded) you typically don’t need to add salt to the finished product.

    When I am making these potatoes to go with steak I will put the pot on to boil and get that going before I put the steaks into the pan. You can hold the potatoes hot in a double boiler or on the side of the stove protected from scorching for about a half hour, but you don’t ever want the steaks waiting for potatoes.
    15 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why is the food I make so disgusting?

    Best answer: (sigh) ....please take a seat.


    ....you're a crap cook.
    Best answer: (sigh) ....please take a seat.


    ....you're a crap cook.
    13 answers · 16 hours ago
  • What are simple snacks that I can eat?

    Besides fruits and veggies, what are other simple snacks I can eat that have no sugar? I seem to always end up eating crackers and cheese and I want to change it up.
    Besides fruits and veggies, what are other simple snacks I can eat that have no sugar? I seem to always end up eating crackers and cheese and I want to change it up.
    12 answers · 1 day ago
  • Would you eat cheese cookies or cheese brownies, ??

    Best answer: If they were sweet with a hint of buttermilk. I would call them "Goldies". And nuts of some kind. I don't know which.
    Best answer: If they were sweet with a hint of buttermilk. I would call them "Goldies". And nuts of some kind. I don't know which.
    10 answers · 1 day ago
  • How do I dry dates for use in cookies?

    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is dry mustard?

    17 answers · 3 days ago
  • What are some recipes that use buttermilk in them?

    Best answer: Good for marinades, and adding to baked goods instead of milk, including pancakes.
    Best answer: Good for marinades, and adding to baked goods instead of milk, including pancakes.
    18 answers · 4 days ago
  • How to make a cake?

    Best answer: follow a bakers online by video and not just by question to know step by step
    Best answer: follow a bakers online by video and not just by question to know step by step
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can I refreeze microwave foods?

    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • 2/3 of KFCs are closed in the UK due to chicken shortages. Why didn't KFC simply raise the price of its food to prevent this?

    Shortages don't happen if the price is high enough.
    Shortages don't happen if the price is high enough.
    19 answers · 4 days ago
  • Can someone tell me a good place to find recipes for Louisiana cuisine?

    Hi, my wife is from New Orleans and she misses the food a lot now we live in England. She can't cook at all we get takeout or microwave stuff most nights but I am a good cook so I want to cook her some cuisine from New Orleans this weekend. Can you hook me up with recipes please? Or tell me some dishes or info... show more
    Hi, my wife is from New Orleans and she misses the food a lot now we live in England. She can't cook at all we get takeout or microwave stuff most nights but I am a good cook so I want to cook her some cuisine from New Orleans this weekend. Can you hook me up with recipes please? Or tell me some dishes or info about the food please ?
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • Accidentally ate pink-ish chicken?

    I cooked a Cornish game hen in my oven, and I’m concerned that parts of it may have been under cooked. I was always told that if you pierce the chicken in the thickest part, and the juice runs clear it’s done. True? The breast was fully cooked, but I’m worried about the legs. I absentmindedly ate one leg, but when... show more
    I cooked a Cornish game hen in my oven, and I’m concerned that parts of it may have been under cooked. I was always told that if you pierce the chicken in the thickest part, and the juice runs clear it’s done. True? The breast was fully cooked, but I’m worried about the legs. I absentmindedly ate one leg, but when I looked at the other it was reddish near the bone. I’ve seen plenty of fully cooked chicken that still retains some pigment right next to the bone, but it looked a little too red. Sooo, does that sound like I under cooked it? Again the breast is fine, and the skin was dark and crisp. If so, What are my chances of getting food poisoning, is there anything I can do now after I ate it, and when will I know? Thanks
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • What goes well with chicken fried steak?

    Best answer: biscuits, mashed potatoes and gravy and green beans. And for dessert a Peach crisp.
    Best answer: biscuits, mashed potatoes and gravy and green beans. And for dessert a Peach crisp.
    30 answers · 6 days ago
  • Would you rather bake a cake or cook a pot of roast?

    Best answer: I'd rather cook a pot of roast but eat the cake.
    Best answer: I'd rather cook a pot of roast but eat the cake.
    14 answers · 4 days ago