• Is the F 460 considered an Attack Helicopter?

    Best answer: Never heard of an F 460 helicopter. The CH-46 Sea Knight is a transport helicopter.
    Best answer: Never heard of an F 460 helicopter. The CH-46 Sea Knight is a transport helicopter.
    5 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • Commercial Pilots License?

    Why don’t flight schools just start students off at a commercial pilots license? Like that’s what the military does so why can’t civilians to that? In my opinion they should just eliminate the private pilots license and just have everyone get the commercial license.
    Why don’t flight schools just start students off at a commercial pilots license? Like that’s what the military does so why can’t civilians to that? In my opinion they should just eliminate the private pilots license and just have everyone get the commercial license.
    8 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • How do pilots prevent nature calls when flying a small plane that doesn’t have a toilet?

    Best answer: Pilot relief tube. Search on Internet here: https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=Pilot+relief+tube&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    Best answer: Pilot relief tube. Search on Internet here: https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=Pilot+relief+tube&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
    14 answers · 2 weeks ago
  • What should I do if i want to become a pilot?

    Best answer: First of all, congrats on your dream of becoming a pilot! Flying is just awesome. Second, you don't need to get a degree in aviation to be a commercial pilot. You can get all your ratings from a non-university flight school at a municipal airport. I used to work at a flight school at a small municipal... show more
    Best answer: First of all, congrats on your dream of becoming a pilot! Flying is just awesome. Second, you don't need to get a degree in aviation to be a commercial pilot. You can get all your ratings from a non-university flight school at a municipal airport. I used to work at a flight school at a small municipal airport where people could get their private, instrument, commercial, and multi engine ratings as well as high performance/complex and tailwheel endorsements. Many of our students went on to get flying jobs. You would be much better off getting a degree in something else that can benefit you within the aviation industry, or outside of it entirely. You could get an aviation degree that focuses on aviation mechanics and get your A&P license, which would be very desirable if you don't end up flying for a career. You could also get a degree in business or computer science, both of which can benefit you working for an airline or any other type of company. My first flight instructor had an art degree, and he went on to fly for an airline.

    Just because you get an aviation degree that focuses on being a professional pilot, that is no guarantee that things will work out in your favor and put you into an airline job. I have a Bachelor's degree in aviation science, in the professional pilot field, and that career dream fell flat because I didn't have the connections to know who to blow to get a flying job. Now I have no other education background to fall back on and that makes it very difficult to find a good career.

    Mainly what you have to do first is go for an introductory flight to see what it's like, and take a lot of time talking with the flight instructor about the aviation industry and your career goals. If you find you like flying (who wouldn't?), start out going for your private pilot certificate. Follow that up with your instrument pilot certificate. From there you can go for the commercial and then the multi-engine ratings. (Do the commercial one first, or if you do commercial and multi at the same time, at least do the commercial checkride first. If you do the multi engine checkride first, that won't count as a commercial multi engine rating, so when you do the commercial pilot checkride you'll then have to do the multi engine checkride again to commercial pilot standards, therefore paying for it twice.)

    Finally, flying has gotten really expensive. When I started out flying it was cheap, but over the years the hourly rental rate for even a small plane has doubled or even tripled. The price of fuel has quadrupled at the very least. If you can buy your own airplane or have access to a plane owned by a family member or friend, that can save you a ton of money (buying your own airplane wouldn't be cheap, but in the end you'd own it while renting for years gets you no closer to owning anything, and airplanes retain their value over time because of the regular maintenance).

    Checking out the Civil Air Patrol as others have suggested is a good idea, too. See what you can do for them and what they can do for you.

    BTW, I have to add, using a computer flight simulator like Microsoft Flight Sim can greatly help you with your instrument training because it helps you practice flight planning, follow your route, monitor radio navigation and maintain a proper track, plan for and interact with winds, and everything. That's because it's all procedures that you're following. Flight simulators can't give you that seat-of-the-pants feeling to understand all the movement and control forces, making it not very good for helping you with the private pilot training (although just as with instrument flying it helps you practice all the procedures of flight planning, radio navigation, etc.), but they're wonderful for the very technical aspects of instrument flying. I actually practiced instrument flight planning and procedures back in the mid 90s with SubLOGIC Flight Simulator II on my Commodore 64. It worked because following the needles on the instruments was all the same. Plus, Flight Sim has models of the very same radio panels and GPS units that are common in aircraft, letting you practice with those pieces of equipment and get fluent in using them without ever having to sit in the airplane. There are other brands of flight simulator you can choose from that may be very good as well, but I have no experience with them to suggest anything.
    20 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • How close can a plane get to Area 51?

    Best answer: The absolute closest you can get to Groom Lake is about 12 nautical miles, at a point east of the center of the salt flat. This would put your aircraft just outside restricted areas R-4808N and R-4806W. There's Alamo, a public use airport, just 15 miles further east, and between this airport and tours out of... show more
    Best answer: The absolute closest you can get to Groom Lake is about 12 nautical miles, at a point east of the center of the salt flat. This would put your aircraft just outside restricted areas R-4808N and R-4806W. There's Alamo, a public use airport, just 15 miles further east, and between this airport and tours out of Vegas, flights do it all the time. However, even outside the restricted airspace, these flights operate in the much larger Desert MOA (Military Operations Area), which is controlled by Nellis AFB. Commercial flights HAVE to be in contact with Nellis approach. They get really grumpy when aircraft wander into the MOA with no contact, especially during busy military training flights... and they're almost always busy, EXCEPT on weekends. That's why most of the charters book their rabid E.T. hunters for weekends. As for the occasional idiot who flies into the MOA with no radio, they can't legally bust him for it, but he does risk becoming a "participant" of an exercise. When other "participants" are armed with radar guided missiles, you see why it's a bad idea.

    The closest I have personally flown to Groom Lake is about 20nm, on a route between LLOAF intersection and Alamo. I used to fly into North Las Vegas with somewhat regularity, and this was part of the VFR route I used for arriving and departing to the north. IFR flights won't take you as close, especially when the MOA is hot. From 20nm, you can definitely make out Runway 14L/32R (the long asphalt runway), and you can see some of the bigger hangars. If they were actually flying something there (a Janet flight or something else classified), a pilot with sharp eyes and some binoculars might even be able to see it. It doesn't matter though. The secret stuff you still won't see. Check out "Flying the SR-71" by retired USAF Col. Richard Graham... one of my favorite books on military aircraft. The most secret part of the tests were the radar signature returns the Groom controllers on the ground saw and recorded while they were testing its stealth abilities. That and how they obtained all the titanium... but I'll let you read it yourself.

    If an aircraft actually flew into the restricted airspace, Nellis would first try to hail them on radio. If no success, they would be intercepted by F-15s out of Nellis. If still no success, they would probably follow the aircraft closely to determine its course. Legally, they could shoot it down at this point. But despite all the security at Groom, Tonopah, and the rest of NTTR, it's really bad PR for the Air Force if it shoots down a private aircraft, which is why it hasn't happened (yet). But you would be detained and charged whenever and wherever you landed, not to mention your license would be revoked, fines, interrogations up the butt, possible prison time... fun stuff. Same goes if you fly a toy drone into the restricted airspace.
    11 answers · 3 weeks ago
  • Why do LSA make up such a minuscule segment of the market? Weren't they supposed to be the everyman aircraft and the wave of the future?

    Best answer: As I was typing, JetDoc beat me too it. 'Nuff said.
    Best answer: As I was typing, JetDoc beat me too it. 'Nuff said.
    6 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • Which airports in the US support the airbus a380?

    Best answer: The following airports meet the FAA design standards for the A380: Anchorage International Airport Denver International Airport Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport John F. Kennedy International Airport Los Angeles International Airport Orlando International Airport Miami International Airport San... show more
    Best answer: The following airports meet the FAA design standards for the A380:

    Anchorage International Airport

    Denver International Airport

    Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Los Angeles International Airport

    Orlando International Airport

    Miami International Airport

    San Francisco International Airport

    In addition, three airports can handle A380 cargo planes:

    Memphis International Airport

    Louisville International-Standiford Field Airport

    Ontario International Airport (California)

    Dulles International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport are close to being ready for the A380, according to the FAA.

    ___

    Source: Federal Aviation Administration

    ............... and Toronto, CANADA (YYZ)
    5 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • When you fly over the Atlantic, which country's air traffic control do the pilots take instructions from?

    Best answer: Three crap answers. Radar coverage, and VHF radio communications, end about 200 miles out from shore. (Laws of physics, and curvature of the Earth.) Formal Air Traffic Control does not apply in that uncovered space. Flight crews follow their flight plans, and depend on greater sequence spacing, and onboard... show more
    Best answer: Three crap answers.

    Radar coverage, and VHF radio communications, end about 200 miles out from shore. (Laws of physics, and curvature of the Earth.)

    Formal Air Traffic Control does not apply in that uncovered space. Flight crews follow their flight plans, and depend on greater sequence spacing, and onboard systems (TCAS) to maintain separation between aircraft. Oceanic traffic volume is low enough that this works well enough.

    Air Traffic Controllers do perform "flight following": they receive position reports from aircraft via HF radio (shortwave bands) and maintain an idea of each aircraft's progress. But that's not formal ATC, and they don't issue instructions to aircraft.

    This may change as communications and surveillance technology moves away from VHF and radar to satellite systems: ADS-B.

    TL;DR: There's no "Air Traffic Control" over the oceans, just flight following.
    8 answers · 4 weeks ago
  • How does a trans-Pacific flight cope with the earths rotation when flying due north?

    Best answer: Most "transpacific" flights don't actually fly over the pacific. They follow a northern arc.
    Best answer: Most "transpacific" flights don't actually fly over the pacific. They follow a northern arc.
    9 answers · 1 month ago
  • Why isn't black box data recorded via cloud technology?

    Best answer: "Cloud" connectivity, as generally described, needs a mobile network. Last I looked, there weren't a lot of cell phone towers in the ocean. What you need is satellite connectivity. We are already seeing maintenance data that often duplicates some of the flight data recorder information going that... show more
    Best answer: "Cloud" connectivity, as generally described, needs a mobile network. Last I looked, there weren't a lot of cell phone towers in the ocean.

    What you need is satellite connectivity. We are already seeing maintenance data that often duplicates some of the flight data recorder information going that way. But there isn't enough satellite capacity to replace the cockpit voice recorder, which requires several channels of high quality audio.

    We may get there. But not yet.
    5 answers · 1 month ago
  • Is it possible for an airship gone missing over 100 years ago to still be flying around?

    Best answer: No. It is basically a balloon filled with Hydrogen gas. As you know balloons filled with Helium gas also float. Helium atom is TWICE the size of a Hydrogen atom...and helium balloons finally get soft and land as the Helium escaped between the molecules that make up the bag. Hydrogen would escape even faster... show more
    Best answer: No. It is basically a balloon filled with Hydrogen gas. As you know balloons filled with Helium gas also float. Helium atom is TWICE the size of a Hydrogen atom...and helium balloons finally get soft and land as the Helium escaped between the molecules that make up the bag. Hydrogen would escape even faster because it is smaller, so it would have landed somewhere...in 1906.
    16 answers · 1 month ago